DVDs and Other Resources

The books were written by Carol Lee Gho and developed by Joy Simon as part of the Project Alaska Indigenous People’s Academy Grant. The information for the books came from several Alaska Native Elders who taught certified Alaska Native Teachers the skills, stories, and cultural activities at two-week camps along several different rivers in interior Alaska. The resource books were made with the intent they be used along side the Culturally Based Curriculum Units that were developed by teachers and published by AINE. The K-12 resource books were designed for students and teachers as a research tool to gain background knowledge about the Alaska Native People. Each book is 30-80 pages with photos and information on the cultural activities.

 

Ordering Information

Culturally Based Curriculum Units: (Hard Copies Only)                         $22.00 + S/H

   Complete Set of Curriculum Units (13 Units)                                     $300.00 + S/H
Complete Set of Curriculum Units (CD's Copies Only)                           $75.00 + S/H

   (missing #7, 8,and 14)

K-12 Student & Teacher Resource Books: (Hard Copies Only)             $28.00 + S/H

Other Resources Available

The Alaska Indigenous Peoples' Academy, DVDs                                 $25.00 + S/H

AINE Learning Styles Video                                                                    $25.00 + S/H

Book: Evelyn Alexander: A Life History in her Own Words                     $10.00 + S/H

Book: Teedlay t'iin naholndak niign: Stories by the Tetlin People           $10.00 + S/H

DVD'S and Book

Ten Thousand Years of Learning, 25 Minutes

The Alaska Indigenous Peoples' Academy,1998

In August 1996, six Native Elders and eleven certified teachers attended an Elders Academy in Old Minto. Since then, AINE has hosted a camp each summer at different locations in Interior Alaska. The Elders have taught the teachers many traditional Athabascan skills, such as how to make a Soos (winter cache), cut fish, birch bark basket, fish net, and the use of traditional tools. Many stories were told about the items they used and the traditional values associated with each. As a result of the five academies, teachers have developed Athabascan curriculum units that meet the Alaska State Content and Cultural Standards.In August 1996, six Native Elders and eleven certified teachers attended an Elders Academy in Old Minto. Since then, AINE has hosted a camp each summer at different locations in Interior Alaska. The Elders have taught the teachers many traditional Athabascan skills, such as how to make a Soos (winter cache), cut fish, birch bark basket, fish net, and the use of traditional tools. Many stories were told about the items they used and the traditional values associated with each. As a result of the five academies, teachers have developed Athabascan curriculum units that meet the Alaska State Content and Cultural Standards.

The Alaska Project: "Preserving A Culture", 25 minutes

The Alaska Indigenous Peoples' Academy, 2001

Learn about the Athabascan culture from Native Elders at the Alaska Indigenous Peoples’ Academy campsite on the Yukon River. Seven certified Native teachers of the Association of Interior Native Educators discuss ideas on how to use the information in the classroom. Also view majestic scenes on a day trip with the group of Native Elders and teachers.

CD: The Alaska Project: "Remembering the Elders", 25 minutes

The Alaska Indigenous Peoples' Academy, 2003

Join the Association of Interior Native Educators members and selected elders at their 6th Annual Elders Academy held at Howard Luke’s Gaalee’ya Spirit Camp in August 2001. The Camp is located near Old Chena Village on Tanana River. The focus of the Elders Academy was on Caribou.

This CD video has four sections:

  • Caribou Tufting (Selina Alexander)

  • Caribou Legging Boots (Paulina Stickman and Pauline Peter)

  • Willow Root Basket Making (Lina Demoski)

  • Willow Fish Trap (Howard Luke)

CD: AINE Learning Styles Video

AINE 2009

Updating

Book: Evelyn Alexander: A life History in Her Own Words

in collaboration with Joshua Weiser, AINE 2007

Evelyn Alexander's Life Story gave us a glimopse into a way of life in Interior Alaska that is gradually fading from memory as those who experienced it first hand pass on. In collaboration with Joshua Weiser, Evelyn describes her experiences growing up in the Minto Flats area and how the demands of day-to-day living forged a close relationship to the land and those she shared her life with. Through her words, we were able to gain an appreciation of the immense changes that people of her generation underwent in their lifetime. Young and old can learn from Evelyn's story.

Published by Alaska Native Knowledge Network, University of Alaska Fairbanks

Cover and Text design by ImageCraft Publications & Design

Book: Teedlay t'iin naholndak niign: Stories by the Tetlin People

Told by Cora David in her Native Athabascan Language


Teedlay t'iin naholndak niign, Stories by the Tetlin People, describes life as it used to be along the upper Tanana River of Alaska. Cora David's stories describe growing up---the migratory lifestyle, the food, the toys---as well as the history of the Tetlin people---natural disasters, interactions with the land and animals, andancient warfare.

 

Cora tells her stories in Upper Tanana Athabascan. The stories are transcribes and translated into English (on facing pages) by Olga Lovick with the help of Roy Sam, Avis Sam, and Rosa Brewer.

 

Cora David, born in 1935 in Nahk'ade ('fish trap', Last Tetlin), grew up "in the old way," following a seasonal round to harvest the land's resources.

 

Olga Lovick is a linguist with First NAtions University of Canda. She has work with Cora David and other Upper Tanana Elders since 2006